Tuesday, March 13, 2012

MF Global article

Here's a good article on MFGlobal by the NY Times... 

... a few weeks ago, Azam Ahmed and Ben Protess, who have done a remarkable job covering the MF Global bankruptcy for The Times, wrote an article suggesting that prosecutors were having trouble putting together a criminal case against anyone at MF Global. So far, wrote Ahmed and Protess, they’d been “unable to find a smoking gun.” In fact, they continued, “a number of federal prosecutors have expressed doubts” that MF Global “intentionally misused customer money.” Apparently, the current theory is that it was all just a big accident, the chaos of those final days causing the firm’s executives to tap into customer funds without realizing it.

Excuse me while I roll my eyes. Of course there isn’t a smoking gun. As a general rule, financial professionals tend not to write e-mails that say, “Hey, we’re desperate. Let’s break into the customer accounts!” And, of course, they are always going to say it was unintentional. They are saying it already, starting with Corzine, who told Congress last year that “there was no intention to violate segregation rules.”

... A failure to prosecute anyone at MF Global would be, if anything, even worse. It would mean that executives at a broker-dealer can indeed steal customer money and get away with it — so long as it was “unintentional.” And it would only deepen the cynicism so many people feel about government. I’ve heard it suggested, for instance, that the Justice Department won’t prosecute Corzine because it would hurt President Obama. (Corzine, the former governor of New Jersey, had been a big fund-raiser for the president.) I don’t happen to subscribe to that theory, but I certainly understand why others might.

To be sure, it is early yet. Federal investigators are still digging into the facts surrounding MF Global’s failure, no doubt searching for that elusive smoking gun. But if, in the end, they decide they can’t make a case, I hope they understand what they are telling the rest of us. Giving the big guys a pass isn’t good for the financial markets. And it isn’t good for democracy either.

Read more here:

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Dallas Fed: Markets Hooked on "Monetary Morphine"

Dallas Fed President Richard Fisher said the markets are hooked on "monetary morphine" and he sees no reason for further easing.

Dallas Fed President Richard Fisher said the markets are hooked on "monetary morphine" and he sees no reason for further easing.

Fed officials have said they would consider another round of quantitative easing or QE3 if the economy needs it.
"Personally, I see no need to do another additional dose unless the patient goes into post-operative decline," said Fisher, speaking at the CERAWeek energy conferenceMonday evening.

Read more here:

On a side note, we haven't had stock indicator updates in a while because our models remain in their modes as of the last update.